<< Home Page | L'Estrange Index

Aesop's Fables: Sir Roger L'Estrange (1692)

184. JUPITER'S WEDDING (Perry 106)

When the Toy had once taken Jupiter in the Head to enter into a State of Matrimony, he resolv'd, for the Honour of his Celestial Lady, that the whole World should keep a Festival upon the Day of his Marriage, and so Invited all Living Creatures, Tag, Rag, and Bob-tail, to the Solemnity of the Wedding. They all came in very good Time, saving only the Tortoise. Jupiter told him 'twas ill done to make the Company Stay, and ask'd him, Why so late? Why truly, says the Tortoise, I was at Home, at my Own House, my dearly Beloved House, and [Home is Home let it be never so Homely.] Jupiter took it very Ill at his Hands, that he should think himself Better in a Ditch, than in a Palace, and so he pass'd this Judgment upon him; that since he would not be persuaded to come out of his House upon that occasion, he should never Stir abroad again from that Day forward, without his House upon his Head.
THE MORAL. There's a Retreat of Sloth and Affection, as well as of Choice and Virtue: and a Beggar may be as Proud, and as happy too in a Cottage, as a Prince in a Palace.


L'Estrange originally published his version of the fables in 1692. There is a very nice illustrated edition in the Children's Classics series by Knopf: Sir Roger L'Estrange. Aesop - Fables which is available at amazon.com.